Old 02-15-2011, 01:07 PM   #1301
Weird Harold
Opinionated Old Fart
 
Weird Harold's Avatar
 
Weird Harold is offline
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: "Lost Wages", NV USA
Posts: 22,615
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllardChardon View Post
runagate - noun archaic a person who has defected
Interesting word -- as one might expect, it is related to Renegade; both being derived from the latin Renegatus.

With fortuitous timing, it is also the title of a poem relevant to Black History Month:

Runagate Runagate by Robert Hayden

Quote:
"Runagate Runagate," an archaic expression for a runaway slave, opens with especially keen heights of dramatic tension that bring alive the sense of dangerous enterprise and desperate, breathless, and uneven flight that the runaway slaves must have experienced:

Runs falls rises stumbles on from darkness into darkness
and the darkness thicketed with shapes of terror
and the hunters pursuing and the hounds pursuing
and the night cold and the night long and the river
to cross and the jack-muh-lanterns beckoning beckoning
and blackness ahead and when shall I reach that somewhere
morning and keep on going and never turn back and keep on
going
Runagate
Runagate
Runagate
...


From Robert Hayden: A Critical Analysis of His Poetry. Copyright © 1987 by the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
__________________
Answers! I got lots of answers!

(Now if I could just figure out which questions they go to. )
 

Old 02-15-2011, 05:59 PM   #1302
AllardChardon
Literotica Guru
 
AllardChardon's Avatar
 
AllardChardon is online now
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 4,112
Ruction was next to ruckus with the same meaning.

ruckle - verb British to make irregular folds in, especially by pressing or twisting
__________________
Quoted from The Merry Wives of Windsor:

Here will be an old abusing of Godís patience and the Kingís English.

(1.4.4) Mistress Quickly



Check out my website for my full length, humorous, historical, erotica novel,

Salon de Seduction

at http://salondeseduction.com/

and remember Madam Gigi's motto,

"Sex first, and maybe romance later!"
 

Old 02-15-2011, 09:27 PM   #1303
trysail
Catch Me Who Can
 
trysail's Avatar
 
trysail is offline
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: 'twixt here and there
Posts: 18,017

capybara • n. 1. A South American mammal that resembles a giant, long-legged guinea pig. It lives in groups near water and is the largest living rodent. A large population inhabits the Pantanal.







We are talking one big goddamn rat. The damn things are 4 feet long and tip the scales at 80-145 pounds ( 36-66 kg ). That's a bit spooky. The biggest one was 232 pounds! I wouldn't want to run into one of these things on a dark night.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capibara






Last edited by trysail : 02-15-2011 at 09:30 PM.
 

Old 02-16-2011, 11:10 AM   #1304
AllardChardon
Literotica Guru
 
AllardChardon's Avatar
 
AllardChardon is online now
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 4,112
The Los Angeles Zoo has a large group of cabybaras and my schools often went there for field trips. They are rather docile. The meir cats are more entertaining, by far.

rozzer - noun British slang a member of a law enforcement agency
__________________
Quoted from The Merry Wives of Windsor:

Here will be an old abusing of Godís patience and the Kingís English.

(1.4.4) Mistress Quickly



Check out my website for my full length, humorous, historical, erotica novel,

Salon de Seduction

at http://salondeseduction.com/

and remember Madam Gigi's motto,

"Sex first, and maybe romance later!"
 

Old 02-17-2011, 09:42 AM   #1305
AllardChardon
Literotica Guru
 
AllardChardon's Avatar
 
AllardChardon is online now
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 4,112
I never knew the true definition of this one;

rubberneck also rubbernecker - noun one who travels for pleasure
__________________
Quoted from The Merry Wives of Windsor:

Here will be an old abusing of Godís patience and the Kingís English.

(1.4.4) Mistress Quickly



Check out my website for my full length, humorous, historical, erotica novel,

Salon de Seduction

at http://salondeseduction.com/

and remember Madam Gigi's motto,

"Sex first, and maybe romance later!"
 

Old 02-17-2011, 12:16 PM   #1306
Weird Harold
Opinionated Old Fart
 
Weird Harold's Avatar
 
Weird Harold is offline
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: "Lost Wages", NV USA
Posts: 22,615
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllardChardon View Post
I never knew the true definition of this one;

rubberneck also rubbernecker - noun one who travels for pleasure
Not quite the "true" meaning, although it is, perhaps, the original meaning.

Quote:
Etymology

Coined in the sense of "tourist" in the United States in the late 19th century. A favored Americanism of H.L. Mencken.
[edit] Noun

rubberneck (plural rubbernecks)

1. Someone who engages in rubbernecking, or turning and staring.
2. (US, obsolete) A tourist.
3. Someone or something with a flexible neck.
From other online entries, I would say that one cannot be a real rubberneck unless you're in a moving car.
__________________
Answers! I got lots of answers!

(Now if I could just figure out which questions they go to. )
 

Old 02-17-2011, 12:58 PM   #1307
AllardChardon
Literotica Guru
 
AllardChardon's Avatar
 
AllardChardon is online now
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 4,112
Thanks, Harold, it is a strange one.

rubicund - adj of a healthy, reddish color
__________________
Quoted from The Merry Wives of Windsor:

Here will be an old abusing of Godís patience and the Kingís English.

(1.4.4) Mistress Quickly



Check out my website for my full length, humorous, historical, erotica novel,

Salon de Seduction

at http://salondeseduction.com/

and remember Madam Gigi's motto,

"Sex first, and maybe romance later!"
 

Old 02-18-2011, 07:44 AM   #1308
ishtat
Literotica Guru
 
ishtat's Avatar
 
ishtat is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Outback Again
Posts: 2,098
Runagate

Quote:
Originally Posted by Weird Harold View Post
Interesting word -- as one might expect, it is related to Renegade; both being derived from the latin Renegatus.

[/url]
I have found an alternative explanation of runagate which may be interesting. The OED has a quote referring to "thieves,vagabonds and runagates" dated 1677 and suggests the earliest documentation of the word is from 1530.

The separate words run and gate are both Old English in origin and gate is the clue because it has two meanings. A gate can mean :-

1 The thing placed in a gap in a fence or hedge which will open and close.

2 It is an alternative word to street and was commonly used to name important streets in the middle ages in Britain.

Examples include: Kingsgate, Queensgate, Moorgate, Billingsgate, Aldgate(old?), Bishopsgate, Christgate(Canterbury) Almsgate (Wakefield), Gallowsgate, most of which are found in London alone.

Without exception these names are very old and date to when these towns were first established. At that time the towns folk had to look after their own security and the main streets were gated at night; thus their names. Towns of that period were market towns serving rural areas and attracted people who hoped perhaps to make their fortune from the people who came to town to trade their wares.

The alternative explanation of this word suggests that a runagate was a street dweller living on his wits from what they could make on the gates (or street) because it was on the main thoroughfares that they would find the traders coming to buy and sell at market.

It is also pertinent to the idea of a runaway because in the middle ages if a serf or villein could (in theory at least) run away and live within a city's gates for a year he could acquire the rights of a free man.

I think that Christgate in Canterbury (Kent) still has its old gate or at least the arch, and there is another in York but I cannot remember its name.

I don't know whether Harold's or my definition is the correct one but it's fascinating what one word can reveal, and hide at the same time.
__________________
Some of my stuff http://www.literotica.com/stories/me...ge=submissions
 

Old 02-18-2011, 09:07 AM   #1309
oggbashan
Ancient writer
 
oggbashan's Avatar
 
oggbashan is offline
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Facing the sea.
Posts: 27,473
Quote:
Originally Posted by ishtat View Post

...I think that Christgate in Canterbury (Kent) still has its old gate or at least the arch, and there is another in York but I cannot remember its name.

...
Canterbury has its Westgate and the sites of Northgate and Riding Gate are well known. Canterbury Cathedral has its own gate, rebuilt at the town's expense after Wat Tyler's revolt which destroyed the previous one.

Sandwich, Kent still has its Barbican and Fishergate.

Winchelsea, East Sussex still has several gates.

Og

Last edited by oggbashan : 02-18-2011 at 09:17 AM.
 

Old 02-18-2011, 11:02 AM   #1310
AllardChardon
Literotica Guru
 
AllardChardon's Avatar
 
AllardChardon is online now
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 4,112
Thank you Ishtat and Og for the explanation and the wonderful pictures. Runagate sounded more like runaway to me than renegade at first glance.

Here is one I found yesterday at the end of the Ts that I must have missed;

tyro - noun 1. one lacking professional skill and ease in a particular pursuit 2. one who is just starting to learn or do something
__________________
Quoted from The Merry Wives of Windsor:

Here will be an old abusing of Godís patience and the Kingís English.

(1.4.4) Mistress Quickly



Check out my website for my full length, humorous, historical, erotica novel,

Salon de Seduction

at http://salondeseduction.com/

and remember Madam Gigi's motto,

"Sex first, and maybe romance later!"
 

Old 02-18-2011, 11:54 AM   #1311
Chiara_searches
no longer
 
Chiara_searches's Avatar
 
Chiara_searches is offline
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Somewhere with my feet grounded to reality...and love.
Posts: 1,426
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllardChardon View Post
Thank you Ishtat and Og for the explanation and the wonderful pictures. Runagate sounded more like runaway to me than renegade at first glance.

Here is one I found yesterday at the end of the Ts that I must have missed;

tyro - noun 1. one lacking professional skill and ease in a particular pursuit 2. one who is just starting to learn or do something
Thank you for this new word. I get tired of calling myself "newbie."
__________________
"The unexamined life is not worth living." Socrates

"Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind." Dr. Seuss

And some of my writing is here.

If you are suffering from insomnia, my boring dating blog may help put you to sleep.
 

Old 02-18-2011, 01:44 PM   #1312
AllardChardon
Literotica Guru
 
AllardChardon's Avatar
 
AllardChardon is online now
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 4,112
You are welcome, Chiara.

This one caught my eye and is a great scrabble word when inundated with vowels;

rouť - noun an immoral or licentious man
__________________
Quoted from The Merry Wives of Windsor:

Here will be an old abusing of Godís patience and the Kingís English.

(1.4.4) Mistress Quickly



Check out my website for my full length, humorous, historical, erotica novel,

Salon de Seduction

at http://salondeseduction.com/

and remember Madam Gigi's motto,

"Sex first, and maybe romance later!"
 

Old 02-19-2011, 10:28 AM   #1313
AllardChardon
Literotica Guru
 
AllardChardon's Avatar
 
AllardChardon is online now
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 4,112
I could not resist listing these two, seldom-used or not;

roustabout - noun one who labors

rough-and-tumble - adj marked by vigorous physical exertion
__________________
Quoted from The Merry Wives of Windsor:

Here will be an old abusing of Godís patience and the Kingís English.

(1.4.4) Mistress Quickly



Check out my website for my full length, humorous, historical, erotica novel,

Salon de Seduction

at http://salondeseduction.com/

and remember Madam Gigi's motto,

"Sex first, and maybe romance later!"
 

Old 02-20-2011, 05:08 AM   #1314
Xelebes
Little Blue Alien
 
Xelebes's Avatar
 
Xelebes is offline
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 13,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by oggbashan View Post
Canterbury has its Westgate and the sites of Northgate and Riding Gate are well known. Canterbury Cathedral has its own gate, rebuilt at the town's expense after Wat Tyler's revolt which destroyed the previous one.

Sandwich, Kent still has its Barbican and Fishergate.

Winchelsea, East Sussex still has several gates.

Og
Edmonton, Canada has all four gates: Northgate, Eastgate, Westgate and Southgate. Southgate and Northgate are the most familiar as they are the ends of the second busiest bus route in the city and both have major malls there. They are normally considered gates as in a pass as opposed to a street.
__________________
ANAL PROBE!!!

"We can always count on Xelebes to tell us the things we wanted to know, but were afraid to ask Woody Allen."
 

Old 02-20-2011, 05:11 AM   #1315
Xelebes
Little Blue Alien
 
Xelebes's Avatar
 
Xelebes is offline
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 13,069
Kith: Who one knows; friends and kin.
__________________
ANAL PROBE!!!

"We can always count on Xelebes to tell us the things we wanted to know, but were afraid to ask Woody Allen."
 

Old 02-20-2011, 03:00 PM   #1316
AllardChardon
Literotica Guru
 
AllardChardon's Avatar
 
AllardChardon is online now
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 4,112
Afternoon Everyone. Here is one that I seldom see or hear although there is a lot of it lately in the world;

roister - verb to behave riotously
__________________
Quoted from The Merry Wives of Windsor:

Here will be an old abusing of Godís patience and the Kingís English.

(1.4.4) Mistress Quickly



Check out my website for my full length, humorous, historical, erotica novel,

Salon de Seduction

at http://salondeseduction.com/

and remember Madam Gigi's motto,

"Sex first, and maybe romance later!"
 

Old 02-21-2011, 10:21 AM   #1317
trysail
Catch Me Who Can
 
trysail's Avatar
 
trysail is offline
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: 'twixt here and there
Posts: 18,017

fulvous • adj. 1. Reddish yellow; tawny. Fulvous is a color, sometimes described as dull reddish-yellow, brownish-yellow or tawny, it can also been likened to a variation of buff, beige or butterscotch. As an adjective it is used in the names of many species of birds, and occasionally other animals, to describe their appearance.





Yet one more word I've never seen before. I stumbled upon this word in Nina Burleigh's Mirage: Napoleon's Scientists and the Unveiling of Egypt which is a fascinating account of the brief French occupation of Egypt from 1798-1801. As a child, I learned the role of the Rosetta Stone in Champollion's decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphics and because of my later interest in naval history I knew of Nelson's annihilation of the French fleet at Aboukir Bay but I never knew what in hell the French were doing in Egypt in the first place. Subsequent to the military fiasco, many of the French found themselves asking the same question. Likewise, I never understood why, if the French found it, the Rosetta Stone ended up where I last saw it— in the British Museum!


The gender-specific nature of vocabularies invariably amuses me. Women know the names of billions of colors; men know four. Who the hell knows what mauve is?


Quote:
A fulvous, arid nation bisected by a narrow strip of green fertility, Egypt teemed, surprisingly, with life.

Last edited by trysail : 02-21-2011 at 10:54 AM.
 

Old 02-21-2011, 10:52 AM   #1318
AllardChardon
Literotica Guru
 
AllardChardon's Avatar
 
AllardChardon is online now
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 4,112
Mauve was all the rage in the 1850s and it is one of my favorite colors. I have a 1890s dress made of mauve silk that is simply stunning.

mauve - from the French form of Malva "mallow") is a pale lavender-lilac color, one of many in the range of purples.

Mauve is more grey and more blue than a pale tint of magenta would be. Many pale wildflowers called "blue" are actually mauve. Sometimes mauve can be considered a dirty pink or a shade of purple.

Mauve can also be described as pale violet.

Another name for this color is mallow.

The first recorded use of mallow as a color name in English was in 1611.
__________________
Quoted from The Merry Wives of Windsor:

Here will be an old abusing of Godís patience and the Kingís English.

(1.4.4) Mistress Quickly



Check out my website for my full length, humorous, historical, erotica novel,

Salon de Seduction

at http://salondeseduction.com/

and remember Madam Gigi's motto,

"Sex first, and maybe romance later!"
 

Old 02-21-2011, 01:57 PM   #1319
Weird Harold
Opinionated Old Fart
 
Weird Harold's Avatar
 
Weird Harold is offline
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: "Lost Wages", NV USA
Posts: 22,615
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllardChardon View Post
mauve - ... one of many ... purples.
That reminds me of the quip that men only see in "4-bit sixteen color" while women see in "24-bit True color."

Definitions of quip on the Web:

* epigram: a witty saying
* gag: make jokes or quips; "The students were gagging during dinner"
* wisecrack: witty remark
wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn
__________________
Answers! I got lots of answers!

(Now if I could just figure out which questions they go to. )
 

Old 02-21-2011, 03:34 PM   #1320
AllardChardon
Literotica Guru
 
AllardChardon's Avatar
 
AllardChardon is online now
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 4,112
This one is new t me;

rogation - noun a formula of words used in praying
__________________
Quoted from The Merry Wives of Windsor:

Here will be an old abusing of Godís patience and the Kingís English.

(1.4.4) Mistress Quickly



Check out my website for my full length, humorous, historical, erotica novel,

Salon de Seduction

at http://salondeseduction.com/

and remember Madam Gigi's motto,

"Sex first, and maybe romance later!"
 

Old 02-22-2011, 11:18 AM   #1321
AllardChardon
Literotica Guru
 
AllardChardon's Avatar
 
AllardChardon is online now
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 4,112
Anyone know this one?

roborant - adj producing or stimulating physical, mental, or emotional vigor

roborant - noun a medicine that restores or increases vigor
__________________
Quoted from The Merry Wives of Windsor:

Here will be an old abusing of Godís patience and the Kingís English.

(1.4.4) Mistress Quickly



Check out my website for my full length, humorous, historical, erotica novel,

Salon de Seduction

at http://salondeseduction.com/

and remember Madam Gigi's motto,

"Sex first, and maybe romance later!"
 

Old 02-23-2011, 07:03 AM   #1322
ishtat
Literotica Guru
 
ishtat's Avatar
 
ishtat is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Outback Again
Posts: 2,098
Riding

Quote:
Originally Posted by oggbashan View Post
Canterbury has its Westgate and the sites of Northgate and Riding Gate are well known. Canterbury Cathedral has its own gate, rebuilt at the town's expense after Wat Tyler's revolt which destroyed the previous one.

Og
In my earlier post I was in error in suggesting there was a street in Canterbury called Christgate. In fact this is the name of the Cathedral gate; I thought it opened onto a street of the same name but in fact the street it leads to is called Burrgate.

I have been further told but cannot confirm that the Burr suffix is of the same origin as bury in Canterbury and refers to the non ecclesiastical bury (in modern spelling borough).

However, that is not the main reason for my post; I am following up Og's reference to Riding gate. Riding means transporting oneself on the back of a horse, camel, ass etc. but it also means a local government area. In this sense it came into English from old Norse as Thriding or thirding. Thus Englands largest county, Yorkshire, had 3 Ridings, North, West and East but never South.

Developing this idea slightly, consider the word ridden, normally it is defined in most dictionaries as the past participle of ride. But we also say flea-ridden or disease-ridden meaning, infested with or full of fleas or disease. Yet when we rid ourselves of something we clear it away or dispose of it. Interestingly a number of major dictionaries do not have this second definition of ridden at all as a separate word.
__________________
Some of my stuff http://www.literotica.com/stories/me...ge=submissions
 

Old 02-23-2011, 08:35 AM   #1323
oggbashan
Ancient writer
 
oggbashan's Avatar
 
oggbashan is offline
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Facing the sea.
Posts: 27,473
Quote:
Originally Posted by ishtat View Post
In my earlier post I was in error in suggesting there was a street in Canterbury called Christgate. In fact this is the name of the Cathedral gate; I thought it opened onto a street of the same name but in fact the street it leads to is called Burrgate.

I have been further told but cannot confirm that the Burr suffix is of the same origin as bury in Canterbury and refers to the non ecclesiastical bury (in modern spelling borough).

However, that is not the main reason for my post; I am following up Og's reference to Riding gate. Riding means transporting oneself on the back of a horse, camel, ass etc. but it also means a local government area. In this sense it came into English from old Norse as Thriding or thirding. Thus Englands largest county, Yorkshire, had 3 Ridings, North, West and East but never South.

Developing this idea slightly, consider the word ridden, normally it is defined in most dictionaries as the past participle of ride. But we also say flea-ridden or disease-ridden meaning, infested with or full of fleas or disease. Yet when we rid ourselves of something we clear it away or dispose of it. Interestingly a number of major dictionaries do not have this second definition of ridden at all as a separate word.
Topic 1:

Burgate (one 'r') was one of Canterbury's gates. I presume it meant "town gate". The "burghmote" mentioned in the article I've linked to, was the town council. Canterbury still has its burghmote horn which is sounded at the formal annual meetings of Canterbury City Council. Originally it was used to summon the members of the burghmote.

Riding Gate had no connection with the Yorkshire sub-divisions 'Ridings' because the Kentish equivalent was a hundred. Riding gate was so-called because either 1. It was made of red Roman brick and is derived from Anglo-Saxon for 'Red Gate' or 2. It was the road gate on Watling Street, later the A2, which now avoids Canterbury on a bypass.

Topic 2:

Flea-ridden; disease-ridden - I always understood those words to use the past participle of ride because fleas ride on your body (or dog, cat etc.) and disease can be considered to be riding the person who is infected by germs, bacteria, viruses riding on the affected parts of the body.

Og

PS. Edited several times to correct information.

Last edited by oggbashan : 02-23-2011 at 08:57 AM.
 

Old 02-23-2011, 10:31 AM   #1324
AllardChardon
Literotica Guru
 
AllardChardon's Avatar
 
AllardChardon is online now
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 4,112
Thank you Ishtat and Og for the morning English history lesson. I love every one of them. I wish I had something to contribute, but alas, I know not if America has a single gate.

I like the sound of this one;

ritzy - adj slang catering to, used by, or admitting only the wealthy or socially superior
__________________
Quoted from The Merry Wives of Windsor:

Here will be an old abusing of Godís patience and the Kingís English.

(1.4.4) Mistress Quickly



Check out my website for my full length, humorous, historical, erotica novel,

Salon de Seduction

at http://salondeseduction.com/

and remember Madam Gigi's motto,

"Sex first, and maybe romance later!"
 

Old 02-23-2011, 12:25 PM   #1325
oggbashan
Ancient writer
 
oggbashan's Avatar
 
oggbashan is offline
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Facing the sea.
Posts: 27,473
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllardChardon View Post
Thank you Ishtat and Og for the morning English history lesson. I love every one of them. I wish I had something to contribute, but alas, I know not if America has a single gate.

I like the sound of this one;

ritzy - adj slang catering to, used by, or admitting only the wealthy or socially superior
From The Ritz Hotel, Paris and The Ritz Hotel, London which were supposed only to admit the upper social classes.

The real upper classes originally considered the London Ritz too flashy and parvenu and continued to patronise older more established hotels but were eventually won over by the excellence of the cuisine.

Og

Last edited by oggbashan : 02-23-2011 at 12:30 PM.
 
Closed Thread


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:19 AM.

Copyright 1998-2013 Literotica Online. Literotica is a registered trademark.