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Old 11-05-2009, 11:42 AM   #101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dr_mabeuse View Post
Have you people actually made any of these recipes? Because most of them seem like they're just copied from one damned cook book or another, and that a lot of them aren't going to work.

This one for example: have you ever actually tried to melt white chocolate in milk on a stove stop without scalding the milk? It's almost impossible. The best way to melt chocolate on a stove is with a double boiler, which will keep you from scorching the sugar, and that takes like half an hour. A long time to wait for a damned cup of coffee.

An easier way to make this kind of chocolate coffee is to use regular coffee and an envelope of pre-sweetened cocoa mix. Just dump it in. Saves like two hours of potchkying in the kitchen brewing espresso and melting chocolate, with nothing to clean up.

In an earlier recipe for beef barley soup, I noticed there was no beef broth used. Supposedly you made your own broth out of the bones from 1- 1 1/2 pounds of meat. You can't make beef broth out of raw bones. It has no flavor. The bones have to be browned overnight in the oven first, and the bones from that amount of meat aren't going to flavor that much water. You're going to end up with beef-in-water soup with a layer of fat on it. Voice of experience.

Hey, I like to cook as much as the next guy, but how about some recipes we've actually made that don't take 4 hours in the kitchen?
I melt white chocolate every holiday season in the microwave. You have to watch it, but it's quite easy. You do have to be careful to slowly add liquid. I haven't done white chocolate in milk on the stove as an additive to coffee, but I have done other chocolate. If you're just doing a small amount as flavoring, it works pretty well. I wish they would come up with white chocolate instant powder, I'd be first in line and I'd definitely add it to my coffee. I've done what you suggest, however, with the regular chocolate and it works.

I am going to try Di's pumpkin cheesecake recipe (shall I report back?) and I can only really defend my own pumpkin puree, which I do nearly every year and the first time I did it, I did look it up in a cookbook. Pretty easy though.

Perhaps you could add some legitimacy and add a family favorite.
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Old 11-05-2009, 11:56 AM   #102
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dr_mabeuse View Post
Have you people actually made any of these recipes? Because most of them seem like they're just copied from one damned cook book or another, and that a lot of them aren't going to work.

This one for example: have you ever actually tried to melt white chocolate in milk on a stove stop without scalding the milk? It's almost impossible. The best way to melt chocolate on a stove is with a double boiler, which will keep you from scorching the sugar, and that takes like half an hour. A long time to wait for a damned cup of coffee.

An easier way to make this kind of chocolate coffee is to use regular coffee and an envelope of pre-sweetened cocoa mix. Just dump it in. Saves like two hours of potchkying in the kitchen brewing espresso and melting chocolate, with nothing to clean up.

In an earlier recipe for beef barley soup, I noticed there was no beef broth used. Supposedly you made your own broth out of the bones from 1- 1 1/2 pounds of meat. You can't make beef broth out of raw bones. It has no flavor. The bones have to be browned overnight in the oven first, and the bones from that amount of meat aren't going to flavor that much water. You're going to end up with beef-in-water soup with a layer of fat on it. Voice of experience.

Hey, I like to cook as much as the next guy, but how about some recipes we've actually made that don't take 4 hours in the kitchen?
Mine are all tried and true and none of them take four hours. I am a firm believer in the Caveman Gourmet school of cuisine. Good but easy is my motto.
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Old 11-05-2009, 12:53 PM   #103
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Hey Doc, I speed up the melting sometimes by nuking the chocolate first. When the milk is starting to steam on a medium boil, add the coffee and chocolate in. Espresso is easy to make if you have a machine. Takes less time than my coffee-maker. Packaged mixes are okay, but real ingredients and patience, make it take much more special. I only make them for the ladies on those chilly days when they want something hot and sexy to drink.
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Old 11-05-2009, 01:14 PM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dr_mabeuse View Post
Have you people actually made any of these recipes? Because most of them seem like they're just copied from one damned cook book or another, and that a lot of them aren't going to work.

This one for example: have you ever actually tried to melt white chocolate in milk on a stove stop without scalding the milk? It's almost impossible. The best way to melt chocolate on a stove is with a double boiler, which will keep you from scorching the sugar, and that takes like half an hour. A long time to wait for a damned cup of coffee.

An easier way to make this kind of chocolate coffee is to use regular coffee and an envelope of pre-sweetened cocoa mix. Just dump it in. Saves like two hours of potchkying in the kitchen brewing espresso and melting chocolate, with nothing to clean up.

In an earlier recipe for beef barley soup, I noticed there was no beef broth used. Supposedly you made your own broth out of the bones from 1- 1 1/2 pounds of meat. You can't make beef broth out of raw bones. It has no flavor. The bones have to be browned overnight in the oven first, and the bones from that amount of meat aren't going to flavor that much water. You're going to end up with beef-in-water soup with a layer of fat on it. Voice of experience.

Hey, I like to cook as much as the next guy, but how about some recipes we've actually made that don't take 4 hours in the kitchen?
I have made every recipe I have posted more than once.

I certainly credited the cookbook I found them in....authors deserve the credit, right?....but these aren't cut and pasted without being field-tested. They have all worked for me and I enjoyed them.
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Old 11-05-2009, 01:54 PM   #105
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I'll state too, that everything I've posted here is from a recipe that I've prepared more than once. I've even changed directions in some, because I found it works better that way. I have 36 cookbooks, including the course workbook from a culinary class. Somethings, like sauces and rubs are homemade from scratch. I'll try something several times for consistency of results before I post it here.
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Old 11-05-2009, 04:03 PM   #106
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The Og recipes are family standards but the Spotted Dick one hasn't been made for some time because it is very high cholesterol. Getting some of the suet might be difficult in the US.

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Old 11-05-2009, 07:07 PM   #107
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If I post it here it's because I've made it a time or three.

Country Fried Steaks. (In my house they're Pan Steaks)

You will need:

Thin cuts of tough steak. It's okay if they are tough enough to be shoe leather. That's why they are going to be cheap.

An egg or two.

Flour

Bread Crumbs

A bit of Salt and Pepper

Butter

White or Sausage Gravy. (I make this in large lots and freeze it.)

A Fry Pan and a Tenderizer.

Take the cuts of meat and place them on your cutting board. Beat the hell out of them with the tenderizer. I'm talking work out your aggresions.

Dip the steaks in the well beaten eggs and then dredge them in the flour. Salt and pepper them to taste then dip them again before dredging them in the Bread Crumbs.

Melt some of the butter in the Fry Pan while slowly heating the gravy. When the butter is melted add the meat and fry it. It only takes a couple of minutes per side to fry it. Fry until golden brown.

Serve topped with the Gravy and enjoy the hell out of it.

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Old 11-05-2009, 07:15 PM   #108
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Better Than Bread Stuffing

Cut 1 head of cauliflower in chunks and steam until moderately soft. Cut into corn size pieces.

Saute and combine with cauliflower:

2 TBSP Butter
1 cup sage-sausage
1 cup chopped mushrooms
1 cup diced celery
1/2 cup diced onion
2 TBSP chopped garlic

Add and combine well:

2 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese
2 eggs, slightly beaten
1 TBSP white pepper
2 tsp. salt
1 tsp each: dried parsley, sage, hot pepper flakes

Spoon entire mix into a casserole. Flatten with back of large spoon.

Bake in oven while roasting meat. (I do it by itself in a 350 oven until hot and cheese melts)

Let stand while you get the rest of the dinner ready.


It really is better than bread-stuffing!!
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Old 11-05-2009, 07:30 PM   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dr_mabeuse View Post
Have you people actually made any of these recipes?
The ones that I posted are recipes that I do use - that's my comfort food.

I think SeaCat tried some of them after I'd passed them on to him, and MissJett loved the soup (it's wonderful when it's cold out).
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Old 11-05-2009, 07:48 PM   #110
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Easy-Peel Hardboiled Eggs

I hate peeling eggs. Hate hate hate it. And I'm always the one who has to make deviled eggs for family gatherings. SO... I experimented and came up with the EASIEST peel eggs ever. The shells practically fall off!

  • Put eggs in a pot in cold water.
  • Turn burner to "high."
  • Once the water is boiling, set a timer for 10 minutes.
  • When timer goes off, turn off the heat and let the eggs sit for 1 minute.
  • Transfer eggs to the sink and run COLD water over them for 1 minute.
  • Then add a huge amount of ICE to water and let them sit for 1 hour (until they get cold)
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Old 11-05-2009, 09:31 PM   #111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selena_Kitt View Post
Easy-Peel Hardboiled Eggs

I hate peeling eggs. Hate hate hate it. And I'm always the one who has to make deviled eggs for family gatherings. SO... I experimented and came up with the EASIEST peel eggs ever. The shells practically fall off!

  • Put eggs in a pot in cold water.
  • Turn burner to "high."
  • Once the water is boiling, set a timer for 10 minutes.
  • When timer goes off, turn off the heat and let the eggs sit for 1 minute.
  • Transfer eggs to the sink and run COLD water over them for 1 minute.
  • Then add a huge amount of ICE to water and let them sit for 1 hour (until they get cold)
I do this too, but sometimes brand-spankin' new eggs still give me fits. However, and this sometimes helps with those pesky ones, I crack the shells, then let them sit in the icy water.
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Old 11-05-2009, 09:40 PM   #112
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Driphoney's Secret Triple Chocolate Chip Cookies

I just do these for Christmas. Promise you won't tell, okay? It's really hard, so ...

Follow the recipe on the bag of your favorite semi-sweet chocolate chips.

Now comes the hard part:

Add 1/3 to 1/2 cup of cocoa powder to the flour mixture. (This is losey-goosey, just wing it, that's what makes it 'art'. )

When it's time to add the chips, add whatever you like, but total at least 2 cups, if not more. I personally like semi-sweet morsels, white chocolate chips or chunks ( I really love white choc., so I tend to add extra of this), and walnuts.

This will make a firmer cookie, as there is no added liquid, but it works out perfectly. (Well, they always get eaten.)

Bake as directed on the package.
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Old 11-07-2009, 07:00 PM   #113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selena_Kitt View Post
Easy-Peel Hardboiled Eggs

I hate peeling eggs. Hate hate hate it. And I'm always the one who has to make deviled eggs for family gatherings. SO... I experimented and came up with the EASIEST peel eggs ever. The shells practically fall off!

  • Put eggs in a pot in cold water.
  • Turn burner to "high."
  • Once the water is boiling, set a timer for 10 minutes.
  • When timer goes off, turn off the heat and let the eggs sit for 1 minute.
  • Transfer eggs to the sink and run COLD water over them for 1 minute.
  • Then add a huge amount of ICE to water and let them sit for 1 hour (until they get cold)
I read a study in some food magazine where they tried to find the best way to make easy-peel hard-boiled eggs, and they found that the critical variable was not how they were cooked, but how fresh the eggs were. In older eggs, the albumin seeps through that membrane and sticks to the inside of the shell. That's what they said, anyhow.

They gave a recipe too, which was to take the eggs from the fridge and put them in cold water, then raise it to the boil and turn it off. Let the eggs sit for 20 minutes, then give them the cold water treatment. I never tried it.

I didn't know that about melting white chocolate, but one microwave trick I know is for peeling a lot of garlic without using the knife-smash technique. Put the cloves on a microwave-safe plate, and nuke 'em for like 20 seconds. You might have to let them cool a bit before you handle them, but the skins slip right off.

Seacat-- Some time ago you printed a recipe for some barbecued pork you made in the crock-pot. Do you remember it? Because I tried it and it was really good.
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Old 11-07-2009, 11:21 PM   #114
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Old 11-22-2009, 04:31 PM   #115
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Old 11-23-2009, 03:48 PM   #116
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My good deed for the day. I couldn't bear to see all these lovely recipes get lost after Thanksgiving.
From: Tricialen
Cornbread and Sausage Dressing with Apples and Pecans


Southern Cornbread

1 Tbsp. bacon drippings

¾ cup Martha White Self Rising White Corn Meal Mix, plus a little more to dust the pan

¼ cup Martha White Self Rising Flour

1 Tbsp sugar

1 cup Buttermilk

3 Tbsp. Crisco oil

1 Extra large egg, beaten

Heat oven to 450 F. Grease an 8 inch Cast Iron Skillet with bacon drippings and place in the oven to heat.

Combine corn meal mix, flour and sugar in a large mixing bowl; stir together until well mixed. Add buttermilk, oil, and egg all at once; blend well. Sprinkle a small amount of corn meal into hot skillet. Pour batter into the hot skillet and return to oven.

Bake 12 to 15 minutes until golden brown.

Prep time 10 minutes

Cooking time 12- 15 minutes

Six servings

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Martha White ‘Hot Rize’ Biscuits

Crisco No-stick Cooking Spray

2 cups Martha White Self Rising Flour

¼ Tsp. baking soda

¼ stick Crisco Shorting or ¼ cup Crisco Shortening stick

¾ cup plus 2 Tbsp. buttermilk

Heat oven to 450 f. Spray cookie sheet lightly with spray.

Place flour and baking soda in a large mixing bowl. Cut in shortening with a pastry blender or two knives until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Add milk, stir with fork until a soft dough forms and mixture begins to pull away from the sides of bowl.

Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead just until smooth. Roll out dough to ½ inch thickness. Cut with floured 2 inch round cutter. Place biscuits with sides touching on prepared cookie sheet.

Bake 10 to 12 minutes or until golden brown.

Serve warm

Prep time 20 minutes

Cooking time 11 minutes

Servings 14 biscuits
~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For the dressing

5 cups of Southern Cornbread (prepared using above directions)

5 cups Martha White ‘Hot Rize’ Biscuits (prepared using above directions)

1 pound Jimmy Dean pork sausage

1 cup chopped onions

1 cup chopped celery

2 cups chopped unpeeled Granny Smith Apples

1 cup coarsely chopped pecans

½ cup chopped fresh parsley

2 Tsp. dried sage leaves

½ Tsp. dried thyme leaves

½ Tsp. pepper

4 cups chicken broth

Prepare cornbread and biscuits as directed. Cool for about 15 minutes. Crumble enough cornbread to make 5 cups; crumble enough biscuits to make 5 cups. Sit aside.

Heat oven to 375 F. Spray a 13 x 8 inch (3 quart) glass baking pan with Pam. Sit aside.

Cook sausage, onions, and celery in a large skillet over medium-high heat until sausage is browned and veggies are tender, stirring occasionally. If needed add two Tbsp. butter to pan.

Combine sausage and veggies with crumbled cornbread and biscuits in a large bow. Add remaining ingredients, mixing well. Spoon into prepared baking dish.

Bake for 45 to 50 minutes or until golden brown.

Prep time about 20 minutes

Cooking time 50 minutes

Servings 12

This is Sooooo good! Yummy, cannot wait to make it for Thanksgiving.
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Old 11-28-2009, 06:31 PM   #117
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Here's another:

World's Easiest To-Die-For Beef Shortribs

Shortribs are a budget cut of meat with a great flavor. Normally, though, braising is a bit of work. Not this time.

1 1/2 lbs boneless beef short ribs

1 pkg Lipton dried onion soup

1/3 cup oat flour (you can start with oat meal, if necessary)

3 slices bacon

1 1/2 cups water

1/2 cup red wine

Dump the oats and the onion soup mix into a blender or small food processor and grind into a powder. Julienne the bacon and fry it to render out the grease. Set the browned bacon aside. Dredge the beef in the soup/oat mixture and brown in the bacon fat on all sides. Mix 1/3 cup of the remaining dredge with the liquid and pour over the meat. Bring to a boil. Simmer slowly for 2-3 hours. Serve.

Goes good with brown rice, mashed potatoes, egg noodles, biscuits, whathaveyou. Wash it down with a stout claret or dark ale. Deviled carrots would make a good side as would any dark green. Winter comfort food!
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Old 11-29-2009, 04:15 PM   #118
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Rum Balls

Originally Posted by neci_please_me
i love Rum Balls over the holidays. You don't bake them, so they are a potent little kick. oh, and i have been looking around the AH thread, and there are so many good recipes!

Rum Balls

1 (12 ounce) package vanilla wafers, crushed
1 1/2 cups chopped nuts
3/4 cup confectioners' sugar
1/4 cup cocoa
1/2 cup light rum
3 tablespoons light corn syrup
1/8 cup confectioners' sugar

Directions
1.In a large bowl, combine vanilla wafer crumbs, chopped nuts, 3/4 cup confectioners' sugar, and cocoa. Mix in rum and corn syrup. Shape dough into 1 inch balls; roll in confectioners' sugar.
2.Store rum balls in an airtight container for 2 to 3 days to develop flavor. Roll them again in confectioners' sugar before serving.

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Old 11-29-2009, 04:23 PM   #119
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wow. now this thread is what i'm talking about. i love cooking, and would have to count my recipe books. my mother has a collection of over 100 cookbooks from all over. i don't know if i'll ever have as many as her, but it is a little hobby. some of the best recipes i have found come from old cookbooks that i've found at antique shops or garage sales. between The Joy of Cooking and The Joy of Sex....
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Old 11-29-2009, 04:27 PM   #120
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Originally Posted by vrosej10
Maeve O'Meara's Coconut cardamom burfi

A simple and quick cheat's version of the reduced-milk sweet burfi. This is a lovely end to an Indian
feast and is often served at special occasions.
Ingredients:
250g desiccated coconut
395g can sweetened condensed milk
10 cardamom pods - grind/crush seeds into a powder
Handful of pistachio nuts, roughly crushed
Mix 200g of the coconut and the remaining ingredients in a bowl.
Heat a non-stick pan on low heat and add mixture to the pan. Stir over low heat until the mixture
starts to dry and rolls easily into a ball. Remove from the heat. Cool for 5 to 10 minutes until cool
enough to handle.
Place the remaining coconut onto a plate. Using damp hands, roll the mixture into balls and then roll
in coconut to coat. The coconut balls can be refrigerated for up to a week.
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Old 11-29-2009, 04:46 PM   #121
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From Tricialen

Fried Apple Pies

(What can I say? I'm Southern! We can fry anything and make it taste like heaven....)

1 lb. of dried apples
3/4 cup sugar
2 tbsp. butter
2 tsp. cinnamon

Cover the dried fruit with water and let it soak in refrigerator over-night. Drain and add 1/4 to 1/2 cup of fresh cold water and cook over med low heat until tender. Mash the fruit and add the sugar and cinnamon and butter. Mix well and let cool.

Pastry

One bowl full of Lily White( or Martha White Self rising flour) self-rising flour (about two cups). 1/2 cup buttermilk
1/3 cup Crisco shortening

Sift the flour twice and then make a 'well' in the center. Add the buttermilk a little at a time until you judge it the right consistency then add the shortening. Cut the mixture using two table knives or a pastry cutter until the pastry until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Shape dough into a ball and let it rest in the refrigerator for twenty minutes.

Roll out pastry and cut it into 4 inch circles. Place one generous tablespoon of apple mixture on one side of pastry and fold the pastry to cover. Crimp edges with a fork tine dipped in cold water.

Fry pies in 1/2 inch of hot oil, turning once. When pastry is browned, remove it and drain on paper towels. While pastry is still warm dust with powdered sugar.

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Old 11-29-2009, 04:51 PM   #122
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Posted originally by 3113

Pear and Dried Cherry Pie:

1 1/2 cups dried tart cherries
4 pounds firm pears, (about 7), peeled and cored
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice, (2 lemons)
1 cup sugar, plus more for sprinkling
1/2 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
Pie Dough for top and bottom crust
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
Directions

Heat oven to 400 degrees.
*Place cherries in small bowl, cover with 1 cup hot water. Let stand 30 minutes. *Thinly slice pears and toss with lemon juice.
*Drain cherries; add to pears along with sugar, flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves. Toss; set aside.
*Roll out dough for a 9-inch pie pan. Fill pie bottom with reserved cherry-pear filling, and dot with butter.
*Roll out remaining piece of dough and place on top. Crimp top and bottom edges together; cut slits across top of dough. Sprinkle the top of the pie with sugar.
*Bake until the crust is golden and baked through, 40 to 45 minutes. Let cool on a wire rack.

This is not a tested recipe, but 3 and I feel it looks very reasonable. If someone tries it, please contact me and I'll add an update. ~dh~
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Old 11-29-2009, 07:04 PM   #123
ishtat
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Has anyone tried cooking meat or fish very very slowly in vacuum sealed packets?
I understand that is what has produced great results for many of the modern superchefs. Any experience or pitfalls to share.

I went to a place called Tetsuya's in Sydney recently and understand the fish was cooked at about 75 degrees centigrade for a long time in a sealed pack. It was superb.

Cooking in sealed containers has been use in industrial cooking for years but the slowness and low temperature is the difference which seems to transform indifferent cuts into something very special.
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Old 12-05-2009, 09:22 AM   #124
driphoney
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*bump*
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Old 12-12-2009, 08:53 PM   #125
lance gt
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bump fror 410
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