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Old 11-10-2013, 02:08 AM   #5276
Handley_Page
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Presumably, this is as opposed to Malign, Malignant ?
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Old 11-10-2013, 03:10 AM   #5277
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Handley_Page View Post
Presumably, this is as opposed to Malign, Malignant ?
Those are given as antonyms, yes.
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Old 11-10-2013, 05:38 PM   #5278
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Ord

Ord, from the Celtic ord, or Ard,; a headland or promontory, as the Ord of Caithness: Ardnamurchan, &c. 'In Suffolk,' says Mr. Halliwell, 'a promontory is called an ord. The word has also the sense of a beginning, or a point.

And touched him with the spear's ord.
óRomance of Sir Oluel.

Saul drew his sword,
And ran even upon the ord.
óCursor Mundi; Trin Coll. Cam., quoted by Halliwell.

Taken from Lost Beauties of the English Language, by Charles Mackay, LL.D.

Mackay doesn't deign to tell us who Mr. Halliwell may have been.
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Old 11-10-2013, 05:46 PM   #5279
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Originally Posted by Weird Harold View Post
Those are given as antonyms, yes.
Indeed. Malign and malignant both come from, through old French, from the Latin adjective malignus, meaning "unkind, ill-natured, spiteful, stingy." Benign and benignant come from benignus, "kind, friendly, favorable, liberal, lavish."
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Old 11-11-2013, 05:08 AM   #5280
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antimacassar, protective covering thrown over the back of a chair or the head or cushions of a sofa, named after Macassar, a hair-oil in general use in the 19th century. The original antimacassars were made of stiff white crochet-work, but later soft, coloured materials, such as embroidered wools or silks, were used. In the 20th century the use of antimacassars largely died out.
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Old 11-11-2013, 05:48 AM   #5281
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My ole' Granny always had one on the chair-back.
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Old 11-11-2013, 07:47 AM   #5282
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My ole' Granny always had one on the chair-back.
My La-Z-Boy rocker/recliner came with headrest and arm covers that match the upholstery -- I didn't realize I had antimacassars in the house until researching the definition.
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Old 11-11-2013, 09:09 AM   #5283
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My father used to use Brycreem. His hair, like mine, was unmanageable.

My mother always had antimaccassars.

In the 80s and 90s and even now, hair gel is used for styling. Bring back the antimaccassar!

Some of the late 19th and early 20th Century equivalents of Brycreem were unpleasant and had to be strongly perfumed to cover up the stink. Bear grease, goose fat, and even Beef dripping were used as hair products.

Since men (and women) in those eras washed their hair very infrequently, the smell could soon be obnoxious. Brycreem was a vast improvement on the earlier 'pomades'.
 

Old 11-11-2013, 11:04 PM   #5284
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Ooth

Ooth, raging mad; from the German wuth, and the Scottish wud.

From Mackay again. He doesn't tell us whether he's using "mad" in the sense of "angry," or in the sense of "insane," and I don't have an adequate German dictionary. (Or any Scottish one.)
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Old 11-12-2013, 06:01 AM   #5285
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlusMagnus View Post
Ord, from the Celtic ord, or Ard,; a headland or promontory, as the Ord of Caithness: Ardnamurchan, &c. 'In Suffolk,' says Mr. Halliwell, 'a promontory is called an ord. The word has also the sense of a beginning, or a point.

And touched him with the spear's ord.
óRomance of Sir Oluel.

Saul drew his sword,
And ran even upon the ord.
óCursor Mundi; Trin Coll. Cam., quoted by Halliwell.

Taken from Lost Beauties of the English Language, by Charles Mackay, LL.D.

Mackay doesn't deign to tell us who Mr. Halliwell may have been.
Almost certainly James Orchard Halliwell whose Dictionary of Archaic words was published in 1850.
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Old 11-15-2013, 01:43 PM   #5286
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To alleviate server load, we're slowly closing down any threads with over 5,000 posts.

The new thread is here (clickie!).

As annoying as this may be, phasing out all or most of the active super-long/never-ending threads will increase the forum speed substantially. If you see a thread that's active with more than 5,000 posts, please feel free to PM me with the link.

Please note that these threads are not being removed - just closed to new posts.

Thank you for your patience and kind understanding!
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